Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.
Purdue University Purdue Logo Purdue Libraries

Web of Science: Where To Publish

Judy's Notes MS Word file

Databases

Citation Analysis

Citation Analysis

1.        Journal Impact Factor: a measure of the frequency with which the "average article" in a journal has been cited.  Specifically it is the average number of times that articles published in a specific journal in the two previous years (e.g., 2012-2013) were cited in a particular year (i.e., 2014).  This is calculated from other journals within the Web of Science database.  An Impact Factor of 1.0 means that, on average, the articles published one or two year ago have been cited one time.

Eigenfactor Score:  journals are rated according to the number of incoming citations, with citations from highly ranked journals weighted to make a larger contribution to the eigenfactor than those from poorly ranked journals.   Article Influence score measures the average influence of articles in the journal, and is therefore comparable to the traditional impact factor.

“Where To Publish: 

Databases and Resources that Can Help You Choose?”

  MEASURE

Metric name

Useful?

Database with this information

Peer Reviewed

 

yes

Journal website,

Ulrichsweb.com

Cabell's Directories of Publishing Opportunities

Longevity

 

Somewhat

Ulrichsweb.com

Circulation

 

No longer relevant

No longer available in Ulrichsweb

Acceptance rate

 

Somewhat

Cabell's Directories of Publishing Opportunities

Where colleagues publish

 

Somewhat

Survey your colleagues

Expert’s opinion

 

Yes, but requires survey research and becomes dated

Try literature search in library databases or Google Scholar

Citations

  • Citations/year
  • Citations/paper
  • CCI

 

  1. “Impact Factor”,

    “Eigenfactor”

“Article Influence”

 

  1. “CiteScore metrics”, “SJR,” & “SNIP”

 

  1. “CCI”

 

  1. cites/year,  cites/paper, h-index, h5 –index, etc.

 

 

Yes, provides quantitative data.

 

 

  1. Journal Citation Reports: Social Science Edition

 

 

 

  1. www.journalmetrics.copus.com  or Scopus

 

 

 

  1.  Cabell's Directories of Publishing Opportunities

 

  1.  Publish or Perish https://publish-or-perish.en.softonic.com/ which uses Google Scholar data

or Google Scholar

 

h-index

 

Yes

 

The h-index can be calculated from the data from all of the sources above.

 

Citation Analysis

1.        Journal Impact Factor: a measure of the frequency with which the "average article" in a journal has been cited.  Specifically it is the average number of times that articles published in a specific journal in the two previous years (e.g., 2012-2013) were cited in a particular year (i.e., 2014).  This is calculated from other journals within the Web of Science database.  An Impact Factor of 1.0 means that, on average, the articles published one or two year ago have been cited one time.

Eigenfactor Score:  journals are rated according to the number of incoming citations, with citations from highly ranked journals weighted to make a larger contribution to the eigenfactor than those from poorly ranked journals.   Article Influence score measures the average influence of articles in the journal, and is therefore comparable to the traditional impact factor.

From the Journal Citation Reports: Social Science Edition enter journal name in search box to see the various calculations, including the Impact Factor.  Click on the “Category” to see other journals in the same field. 

2.      CiteScore metrics:A family of eight indicators that offer complementary views to analyze the publication influence of serial titles of interest.

. SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): a metric based on the idea that not all citations are the same. With SJR, the subject field, quality and reputation of the journal have a direct effect on the value of a citation.

 Source-Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP : Measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field. The impact of a single citation is given higher value in subject areas where citations are less likely, and vice versa.

Scopus has a “Sources” tab that allows you to compare journals.  Search by key words in the journal titles to see CiteScore, SJR and SNIP scores.  Click on the “rank” in the lower right corner to view the titles in the subject category.

    

 

 

 

Cabell's Classification Index   © (CCI): Cabell's Directories of Publishing Opportunities calculates the average citations per article for each journal from the preceding 3-year period, then puts each journal into a z-score transformed distribution for each discipline and topic.  This yields, for each discipline and topic, an individual ranking environment that consists only of the titles that publish therein.  From there, they use the distribution to categorize each of the journals within each environment into one of three influence classifications that approximate the top 10% (Premier), 11-20% (Significant), and >20% (High). 

 

H Index

 

The Journal h-index expresses the journal's number of articles (h) that have received at least h citations.  It can be calculated using data from Web of Science, Scopus or Google Scholar. ..(Publish or Perish uses Google Scholar data.)

 

Finding g journal h-index using Google Scholar Metrics

The Google Scholar h5-index is based on a five year publication window. (To calculate h-index based on a different range of years use Harzing's Publish or Perish.) 

 

Go to Google Scholar and select Metrics:

  • type in the title of the journal;
  • the h5-index and h5-median will appear if available;
  • select the hyperlinked h5-index to view the h5-core (articles cited at least h times) and to see if the journal is in the top 20 of a subject category.

Selecting the 'Metrics' link [Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google Inc., used with permission]

   

If your journal title does not appear:

  • Try alternate spellings; (e.g. with or without ampersand, alternate title, abbreviated title);
  • Journal may not be indexed by Google Scholar.
  • The h-index may not have been automatically calculated (e.g. where there are fewer than a hundred articles in the five-year period). In this case Publish or Perish can be used to calculate the h-index.

 

Finding journal h-index using Scopus and Web of Science

Scopus

From the Search tab:

  • enter journal title and select Source Title from the drop-down menu;
  • set the desired publication window using the Date Range limit;
  • select Search;
  • check that the target title is the only journal listed under Refine > Source Title in the left-hand side column - if not, tick the box next to the target title and Limit to;
  • Select all documents from the result list (to access this see drop-down options for the checkbox above the list of results);
  • select View citation overview;
  • h-index appears to the left-hand-side of the screen.

Calculating journal h-index in Scopus [Image Source: UniSA Library and Elsevier]

 Web of Science

From Search > Web of Science Core Collection:

  • enter journal title e.g. "organization studies" and select Publication Name from the drop-down menu;
  • set the desired publication window using the Timespan limit;
  • select Search;
  • check that the target title is the only journal listed under Refine Results > Source Titles in the left-hand side column - if not, tick the box next to the target title and Refine;
  • select Create Citation Report;
  • h-index appears to the right-hand-side of the screen.

Calculating journal h-index in Web of Science [Image Source: UniSA Library and Thomson Reuters]

 

Finding the journal h-index using Publish or Perish                           

 

Subject Guide

John Fritch's picture
John Fritch
Contact:
HSSE Library-Rm 346

(765) 49-46735